Invalid command ‘TypesConfig’

Ah but the joys of trying to match the missing module with its obtuse apache error. In this case, we tried to use the TypesConfig directive but the module wasn’t loaded at runtime. Here’s the error:

# service httpd configtest
Syntax error on line 107 of /etc/httpd/conf/httpd.conf:
Invalid command 'TypesConfig', perhaps misspelled or defined by a module
not included in the server configuration

In this case, we were missing the mime module. You can add that module in your httpd.conf file with the following directive:

LoadModule mime_module modules/mod_mime.so

Happy apaching!

Posted in Apache, Applications | Leave a comment



Newlines In WordPress

Did you ever want to add a new line to a WordPress entry but it gives you a new paragraph? Instead of this:

- haha
- papa
- mama

You get this:

- haha

- papa

- mama

I hate that. It adds extra space between each line. Fortunately, there’s an easy fix. In order to produce the first list without spaces between each line, just hold the shift key while you hit return.

Posted in Applications, Wordpress | 1 Comment



Invalid command ‘order’

It would be nice if apache told you which module you were missing. Fortunately, there’s the Internets! Hey, this site is on the Internets let’s see if we can help. I just ran ‘service httpd checkconfig’ and received the following error:

# service httpd configtest
Syntax error on line 92 of /etc/httpd/conf/httpd.conf:
Invalid command 'Order', perhaps misspelled or defined by a module 
not included in the server configuration

After a brute force attempt at adding modules, it became clear that I was missing the following module: authz_host_module. I added that in httpd.conf with the following directive:

LoadModule authz_host_module modules/mod_authz_host.so

You can also compile that module into the binary with the following flag: –enable-authz-host  (in most cases that’s compiled by default but I’m using RedHate’s binary so it was necessary to add it at run time).

Posted in Apache, Applications | Leave a comment



Helpful Perl Functions

The following pair of functions are ones that I use often. As far as I’m concerned, they should be included in perl. This post serves as both a personal place holder and an opportunity to share with the Internets. Chances are you found them at the sweet end of a Google search.

Method: trim
Params: $string
Return:  $str
Usage:   $str = trim($str);

# This function trims white space from the
# front and back of parameter $string.
sub trim() {
  my $thing = shift;
  $thing =~ s/#.*$//; # trim trailing comments
  $thing =~ s/^\s+//; # trim leading whitespace
  $thing =~ s/\s+$//; # trim trailing whitespace
  return $thing;
}

 

Php offers a useful utility function called ‘empty’ which determines whether or not a variable is, well, empty. Here’s the equivalent function is perl:

Method: empty
Params: $string
Returns: boolean
Usage:    if (!empty($string)) { print “Whoo hoo!”; }

sub empty { ! defined $_[0] || ! length $_[0] }

 

I often use timestamps as unique identifiers or in transaction logging. The Internets are full of perl modules that provide timestamp functionality but I generally prefer to roll my own. Why? Mainly for portability. If a script relies on the basic perl library, then it runs on any server with perl installed.

Method: timestamp
Params: none
Returns: $string
Usage:    print timestamp() . “\n”;

# returns a string in the following format:
# YYYYMMDDHHMMSS
sub timestamp() {
  my $now   = time;
  my @date  = localtime $now;
  $date[5] += 1900;
  $date[4] += 1;
  my $stamp = sprintf(
    "%04d%02d%02d%02d%02d",
     $date[5],$date[4],$date[3], $date[2], $date[1], $date[0]
  );
  return $stamp;
}

NOTE: The above function was corrected to include seconds.
Posted in Perl, Programming | 1 Comment